Caribbean Mutton Soup

Mutton Soup

Nothing beats a big bowl of hearty, warming soup. In the Caribbean soup is traditionally served on Saturday’s (Saturday Soup). So, as I happen to be in the mood for it today, here’s my version of a Jamaican classic – mutton soup.

Caribbean Mutton Soup

Serves 6
Prep time 30 minutes
Cook time 2 hours, 30 minutes
Total time 3 hours
Meal type Soup
Misc Serve Hot
A Jamaican classic mutton soup.

Ingredients

  • 3lb mutton (shoulder is best or another cut on-the-bone)
  • 1 teaspoon pimento seeds
  • 500g yam
  • 1 packet pumpkin soup mix
  • 1 large onion
  • 1 large potato
  • 1 cho cho
  • 1 large carrot
  • sprigs of thyme
  • 1 tomatoes
  • 1 bayleaves
  • 1 scotch bonnet pepper
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1 teaspoon tomato puree
  • 1 heaped teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper

Note

A bit about a few of the ingredients, from top left across to bottom right of the picture:
Pumpkin –  seeds can be roasted and eaten as a snack or for a topping
on salads.

Scotch bonnet pepper – is one of the hottest in the world. It has a distinct flavour that packs a punch, POW!

Yam – used in a similar way to potatoes, this variety is known as a hard yam and holds its shape well when cooking.

Dried soup mix – can be made without, but this mix helps give a better depth
of flavour.

Cho cho – looks like a pear with a texture and taste of cucumber.

Pimento seeds (also known as allspice) – looks like peppercorns and similar in flavour to cinnamon, cloves and nutmeg.

Directions

Peel the skins off the yam, cho cho, carrots, onions, potato, chop and set aside (once chopped put the potato in a bowl of salted water till ready to use, it will go brown otherwise). Chop mutton into bite-size pieces, add to a large saucepan and fill with enough water to cover the meat plus a bit extra.
A few ingredients
Bring to the boil, scum will now surface, remove this with a spoon. Add scotch bonnet pepper, pimento seeds and soup mix, reduce heat to a simmer, cover and cook for 2 and a half hours or until the meat falls off the bone.
In the final half hour of cooking add the chopped veg and all the other ingredients. Once done soup should be a thickish consistency, if not, take the lid off and whack the heat up and reduce until so. Serve. This recipe also works well with goat, lamb neck and chicken.

13 Responses to Caribbean Mutton Soup

  1. Hey hon, my mom has just made some soup for me which I need to pick up, love it xx

  2. I wanted to know how to cook this soup for such a long time

    Thankyou so much Tash

  3. You’re welcome. Enjoy!

  4. I cooked the Caribbean Mutton Soup (substituting the mutton with lamb) I was very surprised how well I did, I really enjoyed it. The scotch bonnet pepper be warned has a mighty kick.

    Thankyou Tash I feel more confident now to make my own homemade soup.

    Glen really enjoyed it.

  5. Glad it turned out well.

    Yes the pepper is hot – taking the seeds out can help lessen the heat.

  6. yey thank you, after all these years of eating it im finally gonna hav a go of making it ill let u no how i get on thank you

  7. Hi Toni, thanks for the comment.

    That’s great to hear! And yeah, please do let me know how you got on.

  8. I made this yesterday. It is exactly like the one I used to get from KD’s West Indian takeaway in Willesden. Now that I live in Suffolk I have missed it so much…..until now. So thanks very much for a big bowl of Caribbean heaven.

  9. Aw, that’s lovely. Thanks for reporting back.

  10. I can’t believe how simple it was. Saturday’s are gonna be as good as living back at home now. Thankyou :-)

  11. Well Tash, I started my soup late this evening and I’ve only just finished but let me tell you it was worth it. Little accident as my scotch bonnet split so the flavour is packing a punch but I made a big pot so it diluted the POW! Thank goodness. :-) Anyway I can’t wait for the family to try this tomorrow as it tastes amazing, even better than any caribbean takeaways I’ve had. Thank u so much for sharing this recipe. PS: cho cho – would always see them in the Asian/Caribbean food stores never knew what to do with them,now I do, lovin it. Thanks again ;-)

    • Hi Evie,

      Yay, really happy to hear you rescued the dish. I can take to heat, but you could also take the pepper out a bit earlier so it doesn’t burst. Hope it went down well with the family. And thanks for leaving such a lovely comment :)

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